Churches in Medieval Hungary

1 – THE FORMATION OF THE HIERARCHY OF THE MEDIEVAL CHURCH IN ENGLAND AND HUNGARY, Endre ABKAROVITS
Cathedrals and parish churches surviving from the Middle Ages are among the greatest achievements of architecture attracting a lot of tourists today, but not many visitors are aware of their origin, rank, and function. When studying about English arts foreign students need to be aware of fundamental ecclesiastical concepts, have a thorough knowledge of the historical background and art terminology not only in connection with England, but, in my experience, with their native country as well. Though the structure of the Church was basically similar in the two countries, there were fundamental differences in the size and number of (arch)dioceses and parishes. In this paper I will concentrate mainly on the territorial formation of the hierarchy of the Roman Catholic Church in the eleventh century, which was a decisive period in both England and Hungary, and will conclude with a short description of the present situation.
2 – The Early Period of Lawmaking in Medieval Hungary

 

3 – THE FOUNDATION OF THE ARCHBISHOPRIC OF. KALOCSA: THE BYZANTINE ORIGIN OF THE. SECOND ARCHDIOCESE IN HUNGARY. Istvan Baanl. http://byzantinohungarica.hu/sites/default/files/Ba%C3%A1n%20Istv%C3%A1n/baan_foundation_kalocsa.pdf

4 – Between Rome and Constantinople: The Religious Structure of Medieval Hungary (13th-14th Centuries) http://dspace.bcucluj.ro/jspui/bitstream/123456789/48114/1/Pop%2BIoan%2BAurel-Between%2BRome%2Band%2BConstantinople-1998.pdf

 

 

 

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Byzantine Church in Medieval Hungary

1 – The Role of the Byzantine Church in Medieval Hungary
Gyula Moravcsik
The American Slavic and East European Review
Vol. 6, No. 3/4 (Dec., 1947), pp. 134-151
ACCORDING TO the evidence found in historical records, the first influences of the Byzantine Christian mission had reached the Magyars prior to the conquest of present Hungary while they were still on the shores of the Black Sea. As I have proved in detail in an earlier treatise, we must surmise that, when they took possession of their present land, the Magyar people had brought with them a knowledge of Christianity.
2 – Churches since the Establishment of the Hungarian Kingdom up to Modern Times
3 – THE GREEK CHARTER OF THE HUNGARIAN KING STEPHEN I
The first Hungarian Christian ruler, King Stephen I (997–1038) issued several charters that have survived to this day. One of them is the charter issued on behalf of the nuns from the Monastery of the Holy Theotokos in Veszprémvölgy. The charter was written in the Greek language, and has been the subject of many studies. The original has not been preserved; what remains is a copy from the time of King Coloman, dated to 1109. The charter has not been published in a critical edition in any language other than Hungarian and even though it has been examined by numerous Hungarian scholars, many questions remain open. The aim of the author is to provide a critical edition and an English translation of the charter, but also to clarify some remaining doubts about the charter and its contents. Furthermore, some comparisons will be made with the Byzantine charters issued at the beginning of the 11th and during the 12th century.

The Church’s involvement in the economic life of Early Christian Greek towns

 http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/6221/

Zisimou-Tryfonidi, Eirini (2015)
Ph.D. thesis, University of Birmingham.

Abstract

Inscription-ICG-746_editiontopoiThis thesis wishes to draw attention to the economic, social and political implications of the rise and establishment of the institutional Church in Early Christian Greece, particularly by exploring the pilgrimage, philanthropic and industrial function of the churches’ annexes. The diverse functions of churches annexes, besides reflecting a social dimension, they also reflect economic and political realities that require the development of an interdisciplinary approach, based on civil and ecclesiastical legislation, archaeology, epigraphy, history and theology, in order to explore the extent and the effects of the institutional Church’s activity in Greece. Interpreting Christian archaeology in key excavated sites of Greece by interweaving literary and material evidence both of ecclesiastical and secular origin, will help not only to ascertain how churches stood in relation to adjoining buildings combining religious and economic purposes, but also to restore to the most possible extent the Early Christian Greek urban and rural topographies.

http://etheses.bham.ac.uk/6221/1/ZisimouTryfonidi15PhD%2Dreduced_size.pdf

ZisimouTryfonidi15PhD-reduced_size

Early church organization in Skagafjörður, North Iceland. The results of the Skagafjörður Church Project

Early church organization in Skagafjörður, North Iceland. The results of the Skagafjörður Church Project

http://ojs.novus.no/index.php/CM/article/viewFile/1151/1142 003_Early church organization in Skagafjörður, North Iceland

by GUÐNÝ ZOËGA
The article discusses the results of the Skagafjörður Church project. The aim of the project is to establish the number and nature of the earliest, Christian cemeteries and churches in the county of Skagafjörður, north Iceland. By employing a systematic regional approach to the study of early Christian cemeteries, a more nuanced interpretation of early church development can be generated. The research suggests that at least 130 cemeteries may have been established in Skagafjörður in the 11th century, following the official adaption of Christianity AD 999/1000. The results indicate a swift adoption of Christian burial rites and cemetery architecture and that at first most independent farmsteads had their own Christian household cemetery. The apparent uniformity of burial customs and architecture suggests some form of management or communality from the outset. Many of these cemeteries appear to have gone out of use in the late 11th/ early 12th centuries, an indication of increasing ecclesiastical control.
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